FTL



In the modern age humanity has come to use two different technologies for faster than light travel.

The first is the Krasnikov Tube. This is created by applying negative energy to sympathetic particle pairs, creating a link between the two particles. In the simplest terms, this is the artificial creation of a wormhole. The primary difficulty with this process is the transportation of one half of a particle pair. The distance must still be covered using an alternative method, which means the K-Network has only grown very slowly despite the technology being several centuries old. Another concern is the negative energy requirements needed to keep the tunnel stable. As a result the K-Network is built around a hub system. The first generation hub was the white dwarf Sirius. The current generation hub is the black hole Capricorni X-2. In both of these cases the materials ejected by the stars provides the needed negative energy to power multiple tunnels. Non-hub tube openings are usually kept stable at orbital lagrangian points.

The second technology is the Alcubierre Drive. The basic principle here is to compress space time in front of a vessel while expanding it behind the vessel. This allows the vessel to travel at speeds less than the speed of light while still crossing relative distances as if it were moving faster than light. Accomplishing this feat is a difficult matter though, requiring a singularity drive, a mechanism sufficiently large and requiring high enough energy output to control that only very large ships can be fielded with one. In addition, while inside the “bubble” of the Alcubierre drive it’s impossible to detect what is occurring outside of the bubble. As a result using the drive requires significant calculations and still carries the risk of collision with unmapped bodies.

FTL

The Resurrection Effect Gilheru